David Mountain — Sonic Exteriority: A Dialogue on the Limits of Spatial Thinking

Esther Lamandier’s ‎Decameron: Ballate Monodiques De L’Ars Nova Florentine, 1980.

The next K’ex Lecture will be:

SONIC EXTERIORITY: A DIALOGUE ON THE LIMITS OF SPATIAL THINKING
DAVID MOUNTAIN

WEDNESDAY (2ND OF MAR) AT 17h30-19h00, PWYC (~£3)
CAFÉ ROYALE, ROYAL COLLEGE (BATTERSEA)
SCULPTURE SCHOOL, SW11 4AS

ABSTRACT
… The room is like an endorheic basin – a geological area where rain flows along streams and rivers to a lake that has no further outflow. Such systems are radically external to the major hydrological system of the so-called world ocean, the main gravitational destination. To cross over from the major to the minor system–over a mountainous watershed threshold–requires an unnatural, horizontal agency …

In an otherwise empty space, a largely forgotten piece of recorded music is playing on loop through a speaker or a record player; the only witness is the space itself. To the hypothetical passer-by, curious about the sound in the distance, both the music and the surrounding space seem eerie and unfamiliar, perhaps relics from another time or culture. Through the form of a self-reflexive dialogue integrating the music under discussion, the paper reflects on problematics entailed in its own self-conceptualisation, including temporality and exteriority, later developing localised understandings of space, time, sound and rhythm; understandings which have been shifted through the peculiar encounter. The conversation proceeds in a process of speculative self-reflection, desperately trying to find a way outwards from its entanglement towards a critique of its own context and agency.

David Mountain has a background in Visual Cultures, is pursuing postgraduate research in Urban Theory, and writes on urbanism, geography, music and architecture. His writings attempt to critically illuminate places at which politics, philosophy and history are tangible and fragile. He tries to keep a blog at davemnt.wordpress.com/.

No suggested reading in advance of the lecture.

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